Le Grande Vie

"Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at any time, is all that distinguishes us from the other species”
- Pierre Beaumarchais

Tonight Khloe Kardashian hosts the HPNOTIQ Harmonie launch event at (where else but) the Dream Hotel! Good luck getting past Aalex Julian tonight…

Research shows salt is addictive in the same way hard drugs and cigarettes are.
So there you have it: Fried Chicken = Cocaine
(Research Complements of DailyMail)

Research shows salt is addictive in the same way hard drugs and cigarettes are.

So there you have it: Fried Chicken = Cocaine

(Research Complements of DailyMail)

Get to Know RdV’s VIP Hostess Roxanne Conso
Roxanne Conso, 23Hometown: San FranciscoHostess at: RDV, New York City
ESQUIRE: What exactly is a VIP Hostess?
ROXANNE CONSO: Well, have you been to RDV?
ESQ: No. Never. Explain the place to me.
RC: It’s this lounge below a restaurant called Beaumarchais. It’s a nightclub on one side and a club on the other, and downstairs is a lounge. I work in the lounge. It kind of actually reminds me of Beauty and the Beast, the way it’s decorated — like a living room out of there. Super, super lush materials; couches and chandeliers, candelabras and area rugs. Really beautiful rugs.
ESQ: What’s a typical night like?
RC: When I start I get a list of all the guest lists and reservations for who’s coming in. If I know any of those people, I talk to the waitresses about what their preferences are: what they like to drink, where they like to sit, if they have a preference in waitress or bartender. And then I go up to the door, and it’s my job to accommodate those people and to negotiate deals with people who are coming to the door who we don’t know.
ESQ: What’s the craziest thing you’ve ever seen there?
RC: Obviously, it’s a nightclub, so you get drunk people. There are definitely times where I have to step in because, you know, cocktail waitresses in Manhattan are really hot girls usually. When guys get drunk they like to get touchy-feely and they have to remember, you’re not in a strip club. You’re in a club. You know? I’m sure that’s the worst. Luckily for me I have a GM on the floor and I have security and stuff that I can go to.
ESQ: You’re originally from California, so when you moved to New York, was it super-shocking?
RC: I was born and raised in San Francisco proper, so it is a city, but it’s kind of like a town, too, and I was so ready to get out of there and get somewhere more exciting, but just as liberal. To stay in the States, it’s really Manhattan. I’ve been here five years, and I would never change it for the world. I love the energy in the city. I think it makes you work harder, I think it makes you strive for things. It’s made me really driven, being in Manhattan, and I like that.
ESQ: If you had to give your top things you love about New York…
RC: All the restaurants — I’m a huge foodie. I actually have a food blog.
ESQ: Really?
RC: Yeah. I’m like a 300-pound girl in a skinny girl’s body [laughs]. It’s really bad. I could eat anything, so definitely all the restaurants in Manhattan are big for me.
ESQ: What do you like to eat at work?
RC: Beaumarchais’ T-bone is so good because it’s half filet and half strip. That’s amazing. They also have this brunch party, and they make these super-sick challah French toasts with blueberry compote.
ESQ: You’re not messing around.
RC: I think about food from the minute I wake up ‘til the minute I go to sleep — and I’m a chocolate whore, too.
ESQ: Chocolate whore? That’s a new one. Anyway, you’re the first person someone sees when they walk in the lounge. What’s the initial interaction usually like?
RC: I still have that California thing where it’s hard for me, especially in this industry, because a lot of people are denied at the door. I feel bad saying no to people.
(Interview Complements of Esquire)

Get to Know RdV’s VIP Hostess Roxanne Conso

Roxanne Conso, 23
Hometown: San Francisco
Hostess at: RDV, New York City

ESQUIRE: What exactly is a VIP Hostess?

ROXANNE CONSO: Well, have you been to RDV?

ESQ: No. Never. Explain the place to me.

RC: It’s this lounge below a restaurant called Beaumarchais. It’s a nightclub on one side and a club on the other, and downstairs is a lounge. I work in the lounge. It kind of actually reminds me of Beauty and the Beast, the way it’s decorated — like a living room out of there. Super, super lush materials; couches and chandeliers, candelabras and area rugs. Really beautiful rugs.

ESQ: What’s a typical night like?

RC: When I start I get a list of all the guest lists and reservations for who’s coming in. If I know any of those people, I talk to the waitresses about what their preferences are: what they like to drink, where they like to sit, if they have a preference in waitress or bartender. And then I go up to the door, and it’s my job to accommodate those people and to negotiate deals with people who are coming to the door who we don’t know.

ESQ: What’s the craziest thing you’ve ever seen there?

RC: Obviously, it’s a nightclub, so you get drunk people. There are definitely times where I have to step in because, you know, cocktail waitresses in Manhattan are really hot girls usually. When guys get drunk they like to get touchy-feely and they have to remember, you’re not in a strip club. You’re in a club. You know? I’m sure that’s the worst. Luckily for me I have a GM on the floor and I have security and stuff that I can go to.

ESQ: You’re originally from California, so when you moved to New York, was it super-shocking?

RC: I was born and raised in San Francisco proper, so it is a city, but it’s kind of like a town, too, and I was so ready to get out of there and get somewhere more exciting, but just as liberal. To stay in the States, it’s really Manhattan. I’ve been here five years, and I would never change it for the world. I love the energy in the city. I think it makes you work harder, I think it makes you strive for things. It’s made me really driven, being in Manhattan, and I like that.

ESQ: If you had to give your top things you love about New York…

RC: All the restaurants — I’m a huge foodie. I actually have a food blog.

ESQ: Really?

RC: Yeah. I’m like a 300-pound girl in a skinny girl’s body [laughs]. It’s really bad. I could eat anything, so definitely all the restaurants in Manhattan are big for me.

ESQ: What do you like to eat at work?

RC: Beaumarchais’ T-bone is so good because it’s half filet and half strip. That’s amazing. They also have this brunch party, and they make these super-sick challah French toasts with blueberry compote.

ESQ: You’re not messing around.

RC: I think about food from the minute I wake up ‘til the minute I go to sleep — and I’m a chocolate whore, too.

ESQ: Chocolate whore? That’s a new one. Anyway, you’re the first person someone sees when they walk in the lounge. What’s the initial interaction usually like?

RC: I still have that California thing where it’s hard for me, especially in this industry, because a lot of people are denied at the door. I feel bad saying no to people.


(Interview Complements of Esquire)

VIP Room in St. Tropez has possibly one of the best celebrity line ups we’ve ever seen. From Chuckie to Missy Elliott it seems like Jean Roch’s bi level club VIP Room is the place to be if you want to see big name DJs and performers while in St. Tropez. Also a nice touch, VIP Room comes equipped with its own clothing store of all the VIP Room paraphernalia you would ever care to have and VIP Room has its own fleet of Mazeratis (if that’s your type of thing).

13th Street’s favorite walking billboard of the day is…
(Photo Complements of GuestofaGuest)

13th Street’s favorite walking billboard of the day is…

(Photo Complements of GuestofaGuest)

This new track by Duck Sauce (A-Track and Armand van Helden) definitely deviates from the usual stuff you’d normally hear from them but none the less its a very catchy, yet simple, song that will sure to become popular this summer!

(Video Complements of YouTube User exostalker)

Everyone knows rent in New York City isn’t cheap but these top 5 most expensive sold apartments in New York (so far) definitely redefine prime real estate

Everyone was apparently confused about which season it was at Beaumarchais and Kiss & Fly…

7/14/11

A Taste of our Le Grand Brunch

(Video Complements of YouTube user meshcount)

Just so we clear this up…

This week at the Bryant Park Film Festival: Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

(Trailer Complements of YouTube user wichitaorpheum)

If You’re Not in the City or the Hamptons For The Summer…

…Then there’s a good chance you’re probably in Saint Tropez. Basically the life of the French Riviera, Saint Tropez is home to some of the hottest and most exclusive nightlife (and daylife) spots in Europe. But like every other city across the globe new venues come and the “once-hot-now-not” locations cease to exist (or just get renamed and renovated). Promoter Unik Ernest of Haiti has opened up “The Pool” (right next to Stefano Forever) which will be a beach club/restaurant/night club. David Sinclair will man the DJ booth and I’m sure this spot will turn into the next La Voile Rouge. This week for Bastille Day Jamie Foxx hosts The Pool’s “Sunset Beach Bash” which should involve a lot of flying champagne corks.

Though many people despise the concept, no one can argue that New York City clubs have become heavily bottle service driven. With a few exceptions (The Jane and Westway) most clubs in New York thrive off charging $400 for a bottle that would normally cost $40 at a liquor store.
This all started during 1941 in Japan where bar patrons in Tokyo were able to buy bottles at the bar and the bar would store their unfinished alcohol (unfortunetly the concept didn’t work as well for the recently shuttered Meatpacking Club Tzigan).
In 1988, Paris nightclub “Les Bains Douches” began charging club goers for table reservations which came with a complementary bottle.
During 1993 “The Tunnel” began charging $90 for bottle service (which today seems like a bargain).
Fast forward to 2001 where clubs “Bungalow 8”, “Lotus” and the soon to open “Marquee” really turned bottle service into what it is today by charging $500 for a bottle of Grey Goose. The trend then moved to Las Vegas and Miami.
To be quite honest, in some clubs it does benefit to get a table especially if getting in is a problem or if you’re with a large group. Also its nice to have your own space in a club where you can sit as opposed to standing and getting drinks spilled on you the entire night (which is always fun).
(Photo Complements of newyorktours.posterous.com)

Though many people despise the concept, no one can argue that New York City clubs have become heavily bottle service driven. With a few exceptions (The Jane and Westway) most clubs in New York thrive off charging $400 for a bottle that would normally cost $40 at a liquor store.

This all started during 1941 in Japan where bar patrons in Tokyo were able to buy bottles at the bar and the bar would store their unfinished alcohol (unfortunetly the concept didn’t work as well for the recently shuttered Meatpacking Club Tzigan).

In 1988, Paris nightclub “Les Bains Douches” began charging club goers for table reservations which came with a complementary bottle.

During 1993 “The Tunnel” began charging $90 for bottle service (which today seems like a bargain).

Fast forward to 2001 where clubs “Bungalow 8”, “Lotus” and the soon to open “Marquee” really turned bottle service into what it is today by charging $500 for a bottle of Grey Goose. The trend then moved to Las Vegas and Miami.

To be quite honest, in some clubs it does benefit to get a table especially if getting in is a problem or if you’re with a large group. Also its nice to have your own space in a club where you can sit as opposed to standing and getting drinks spilled on you the entire night (which is always fun).

(Photo Complements of newyorktours.posterous.com)